Understanding Education For Business Owners

What Should You Look for When Choosing a Child-Care Setting for Your Toddler?

If you are sending your toddler off to daycare for the first time, you probably have a lot of concerns. It is only natural to worry about their safety and well-being during the day while you are off at work. You can alleviate most of those concerns by doing your research to find a child-care center that caters to the needs of toddlers. Here’s what you should look for when choosing child care for your toddler. Training and Experience Don’t be afraid to ask the staff about their training and experience in working specifically with toddlers. Because this is an age for rapid development and may be a time of challenging behaviors, it is important that the staff understands what to expect from a toddler. Compare statements from the staff with a list of toddler developmental milestones to determine whether their expectations are in line with healthy development. For example, toddlers are notorious for being bundles of energy that learn as they explore the world around them. Staff members who expects toddlers to remain calm and quiet for long periods may not have an accurate understanding of how toddlers should interact with the world. Likewise, those who insist that toddlers comply with all requests without resistance may have unrealistic expectations of normal toddler behavior. Schedules A regular routine or schedule is beneficial for all children, but it is particularly important for toddlers. This is the time when your youngster is learning important concepts about time and routines. A regular schedule helps them distinguish the time of day (although they won’t be able to express that yet) and helps them anticipate what will happen next. Knowing what to expect builds your child’s sense of security and comfort. A good child-care center for your toddler will have a regular routine that is followed every day. This typically means a strict meal and snack time, as well as a time for rest and a time for play. Communication Although many toddlers are not ready to carry on a full conversation, they are making inroads to building strong communication skills. Look for evidence that the child-care staff interacts regularly with your toddler by talking to them and giving them the opportunity to respond. Likewise, books should be visible and available for children. Storytime should be part of the regular routine, not something that happens occasionally. Children who are read to and allowed to interact […]

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4 Ways to Prepare Your Permitted Teen for Safe Driving Once They Earn Their License

Worried about your permitted teen’s safety on the road once they officially get licensed? Here are a few things you can do to maximize safety and minimize unpleasant surprises once your teen earns their driver’s license. Invest in Driving School An excellent way to make sure that your teen will stay safe once they get behind the wheel alone as a licensed driver is to send them to driving school while they still have their permit. Accredited driving schools know exactly what your state expects in terms of road rules and regulations and will ensure that your teen fully understands them all. And because your teen’s teachers will not have any personal feelings or emotions attached to the training, there is likely to be a lot less stress for both you and your teen while they learn to drive than if you were acting as the teacher. A good driving school will help reinforce good driving habits and teach your teen how to drive distraction-free, even when they are driving with friends. Your teen should also have access to simulations that allow them to practice driving in inclement weather, during night time hours, and on the freeway when the conditions can’t be found on the road at the time. Some states even offer discounts for driving tests if a driver’s education course has been completed. Plan a Few Road Trips Another effective way to ensure that your teen is ready to become a licensed driver by planning a few road trips together while they have their permit. This will give you a chance to gauge how well their driving skills are developing and whether or not they observe safe driving habits in the car. Have your teen drive all the way to your destination and back so you can simply observe and make suggestions as necessary. Take road trips that will give your teen plenty of opportunity to practice driving through different landscapes and road conditions. Choose locations that will expose your teen to driving near beaches, through the mountains, and even in large cities during rush hour. Plan weekend camping trips, day trips to shop for new clothes, and afternoon excursions to watch the sunset at a park outside of town. The more practice your teen has while driving with an experienced adult such as yourself, the less chance they’ll have of being injured in an accident or getting […]

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3 Things Needed To Succeed As An HVAC Project Manager

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that between 2010 and 2020, the demand for HVAC installers will increase by 34%. This demand will also call for qualified project managers to effectively supervise both jobs and technicians. Working as a project manager certainly has its financial rewards as they usually make more than technicians. However, it’s important to have a good grip on what it takes to be a success. Here are three things you’ll need to have in order to get the job done right. The Right Personality Type HVAC project managers rarely do any sort of hands-on work. They are supervising and organizing the behind-the-scenes part of the job. Within a single project, you may be required to handle what it sometimes takes multiple departments to do in another organization (think sales, marketing, and accounting). So how do you know if you’re cut out for this role? Because you will be responsible for pushing your team in the right direction towards the final goal, you’ll need to be a confident people person, assertive but not abrasive, and good at planning things. Here are some other traits and skills that will come in handy: Math. Performing calculations, taking measurements, and estimating prices are all vital parts of the job. Project managers also need to be able to estimate how long it will take to complete a project. Problem Solving. In many cases, you will be the go-to person for any issues that arise. Being able to come up with effective solutions while minimizing frustration among clients and keeping staff motivated will not only serve you well, but it will also make you rise above the rest.   Communication. Listening to what the client wants and being able to effectively communicate what you and your staff are capable of doing (or incapable of doing) is an essential part of the job. You’ll also routinely be required to keep the client updated on the progression of things. Technology. Wireless technology is expanding rapidly in the HVAC field through the use of sensors and controls. Those who are comfortable and even proficient at keeping up with these kinds of changes will be at an advantage.  Jerry Troke of Heat Controller, Inc. states that those who are knowledgeable, dedicated, and know how to take initiative can move forward through many different positions within the HVAC field. So if you possess those qualities, you’re on the right […]

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4 Ways To Jump Start Your Way Into Your Dream Career

Do you have a dream career? Is it something you would love to start, but lack the necessary experience or qualifications? It might seem too time consuming to break into your dream career by starting from scratch. This is especially true if you have already gotten a degree in a different subject, spent years in a different career, or have been a stay-at-home parent since you graduated high school. Don’t worry, though. You can jump start your way into many careers. This means you won’t have to spend years getting additional education or beginning in an entry-level position. Here are four methods you can use to make your leap into your dream career a shorter one. Internship You don’t have to be a college student to do an internship. Many jobs advertise for interns from all walks of life. If you are in college, the internship will give you college credit. If you are not currently a student, an internship gives you valuable experience in your dream career. While most internships are unpaid, you can use the experience they provide you to get a higher level paying job in that career when the internship is done. If you have the savings to do this, or are not currently working, an internship may be ideal for you. Jobs in journalism, government, and teaching are commonly begun with an internship. College Transfer Credits You may already have a large number of college credits that will apply toward a new major. This means you won’t have to start your education all over from scratch to get the degree you need for your dream career. Look into the degree program your ideal career requires and see what classes you need to take. Then, look at your old transcripts from your first degree. You may be surprised at how many of those credits will transfer into your new degree program and put you several semesters ahead of the game. If you’re not sure about which credits will transfer from your old school, contact the new school’s admissions office to ask about transferable credits. Nearly any career that requires a college degree may be able to be jump started using transferable credits. Apprenticeship An apprenticeship is similar to an internship, except it usually pays wages or a salary. Also, you typically don’t require any experience to get an internship. While some apprenticeships will take you with […]

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4 Easy Ways To Prepare Your Child For Daycare And Ease Those First Day Jitters

Sending a child to daycare is something many parents across the country have to do while they go to work because they do not have anyone else to watch their little ones. In fact, the daycare industry will likely continue to see an increase in available employment opportunities for the coming years or more because of the demand. If you are getting ready to send your toddler to a child care center, both you and your little one may feel a bit nervous about the upcoming change. However, there are a few ways to prepare your child for daycare. Start Reading Encouraging Books Do you often read to your child during the day or right before bedtime? If so, you can take that extra time to read a story about going to daycare. One of the many options available is “Cailou: My Day Care Friends.” The sole purpose of the book is to help children feel at ease about making the transition from staying at home with a parent to heading out to a child care center where they will spend several hours with other kids. Children can learn a lot from the books that get read to them. If your toddler is listening to you read about a familiar television character who was willing to give the day care center a try despite feeling nervous and a bit jittery, he or she may feel more comfortable with the change. Your child can easily relate to Cailou and other characters in stories about going to daycare. Take a Tour of the Facility Together You may have already visited the facility to see what it looks like while you were trying to choose a specific center in your area. If your toddler did not get a chance to see what it looks like inside the building, you can ask the staff members to allow the two of you to take a tour together. During the tour, your child will get to see other children who are learning and having a good time while taking a look at some of the other neat amenities offered to the kids. For example, there may be plenty of learning toys and an outdoor playground available for the kids to use when the weather is nice outside. Ask to Bring a Comfort Item Some toddlers are attached to specific comfort items, such as their blanket or […]

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Two Fun, Easy Rainy Day Activities For Your Preschooler

At preschool, it’s easier to prevent boredom on rainy days; kids have plenty of toys at their disposal and can create games with one another. When playtime is over, and it’s time to find activities that are both engaging and educational, teachers and guides turn to creative activities to keep little ones focused on learning and having fun. In this article, you’ll discover three fun, easy rainy day activities that are just right for kids between the ages of two and five. Happy crafting! Magnetic Fishing Pond This one requires a little bit of setup time, and some assistance from mom or dad, but once you have the basics taken care of it’s easy to set up time and time again. First, you’ll need at least one full set of magnetic letters. Multiple sets will provide better results. You’ll also need a toy fishing pole.  Quick tip: If you don’t have a toy fishing pole, you can sub in a stick or even a wooden spoon with a string tied to the end of it! Older children can help out with most areas of this project, but be mindful that the inclusion of small letters and parts, i.e. magnets, means that mom or dad should always supervise. To create your magnetic letter fishing rod, simply tie a magnet onto the end of your fishing line. If you don’t feel that the tie is secure, you can use a drop of hot glue to hold it in place. That’s it–it’s that easy! Next, run a bathtub full of water–the temperature is irrelevant as kids won’t be getting in, just make sure it’s not too hot–and then toss in your magnetic letters. Other magnetic toys, especially sea creatures, make an excellent addition. For extra effect, add a bit of blue food coloring. Kids “fish” by connecting the end of the fishing line with a letter or creature and then pulling them out, one at a time. MAKE IT EDUCATIONAL: To put an educational spin on this project, use multiple sets of letters and have little ones fish out two or three-letter words. This is best for kids ages 5 and older, but may be suitable for younger children with an understanding of letters. Rainy Day Painting This project works best if you know that a significant amount of rainfall is coming well in advance. It’s also better for warmer weather, as kids will […]

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Earn Your Pilot’s License And Use Your Flight Skills To Help Others

If you have always wanted to learn how to fly and enjoy participating in charity projects, you can combine those interests by becoming a licensed pilot and getting involved in volunteer organizations that provide free flights to those in need. You can choose from government-sponsored or non-profit organizations that have a need for civilians who have earned a private pilot license. The following primer provides you with an overview of how to get your license and the type of organizations that need volunteer pilots. Private Pilot Training The first step to becoming a volunteer pilot is finding a federally-certified pilot school. The Federal Aviation Administration certifies flight schools and sets the guidelines for civilians to become pilots. No matter what school you choose, in order to obtain a pilot’s license, you must undergo 40 hours of flight training and pass the FAA’s written exam. However, it may take you more hours, as much as 70, for you to learn how to fly an aircraft successfully. You will learn how to fly solo and at night. A typical private pilot course also includes classroom instruction to prepare you for the written test and provides you with exam study materials. In addition to flight training and an exam, you must also pass a physical administered by an FAA-approved aviation medical examiner. You will have to schedule the physical on your own and the cost is separate from your flight training. The FAA provides an online database of approved medical examiners. Medical Flights If you have a background in healthcare, you may be interested in volunteering for organizations that need pilots to transport patients from rural hospitals to major medical centers. Some non-profits provide free flights for patients who need emergency care, organ transplants, cancer treatment and follow-up visits at hospitals that are far away. You will fly small unpressurized aircraft to transport patients and medical personnel. Depending on the organization you volunteer with, you may end up transporting passengers to hospitals within the state or to major medical institutions in another part of the country. Search and Rescue Flights When you see news reports of search and rescue flights trying to find people that need help in rural areas after avalanches or other natural disasters, you may be surprised to learn that the pilots in the aircraft during the searches are sometimes civilian volunteers. The federally-sponsored Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is an […]

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